First Alerts

TACT Executive Director Senate Update

It was university resources day at Senate Higher Ed today. Tuition (de-deregulation), waivers, set-asides, financial aid – and how they fit into the 60X30TX expectations – didn’t uncover much, except that tuition and the cost of running universities have risen more than four times the rate of middle class income.

When Honoring the Slain, We Must Heed the Warnings of the Living

With the highly contested implementation of Concealed Campus Carry on August 1st looming over the upcoming fall semester, let us not forget those officers who have stood with TACT and all others opposed to SB11.

UT Professors File Lawsuit Citing 1st, 2nd & 14th Amendments

Last Wednesday the Texas Tribune reported three University of Texas at Austin Professors: Jennifer Lynn Glass, Lisa Moore and Mia Carter filed a suit requesting a federal judge grant an injunction which would stop campus concealed carry from taking effect August 1st, 2016 at Texas public universities. (Community Colleges do not have to implement SB11 until August, 2017 and no private Texas universities have “opted-in”).

Are Corporate Funded Research Grants and Federal Regulations the Answers to Texas Public Universities’ Financial Woes?

On the heels of TACT’s First Alert last week, the rising cost of Texas tuitions are the topic for discussion at the Capital. The Austin American Statesman reported (click here for full article) on a meeting between UT President Greg Fenves, House Speaker Joe Strauss and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison to discuss a national study which suggests the road to financial redemption for public universities is paved with corporate dollars and federal rule changing.

Texas Colleges respond to increasing costs by raising tuition. Educators feeling left out of discussion.

The University of Texas at Austin and other universities are combating criticism over their decisions to increase tuition. These jabs are not only coming from the students and parents who will pay the increased tuition, but also from the Texas Legislature. The institutions claim the reason for the tuition increase is in response to the state funding as a reduced percentage of total costs.